Jan. 26 – Feb. 28: Talking points

On exhibit this month at Polyglot is a collective of work by Sarah Davis, Zoe Siegel, Adrian Guerrero & Michelangelo Bastiani.  As a follow-up from the gallery’s recent involvement in International Art Fairs, the exhibit titled “Talking points” contemplates the projected image each artist actively pursues through the themes of their artwork when it is destined for an international, multi-cultural public in a globalized art market.

For a PDF catalog of the exhibit, please request at info@polyglotgallery.com.

Gordon & Maureen Morris – Anomalies

If while walking into the gallery you feel as if you have been sucked into a vortex in the space time continuum, then congratulations, you have stumbled across the most entertaining and creative show of the year, Anomalies, by Gordon and Maureen Morris.

Maureen and Gordon Morris met in college where they both graduated from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto.  Gordon started out on a career in graphic design back when the work was all done by airbrush but he soon found himself on the cusp of the early use of computers to produce these images.   He was able to adapt his style to the computer and soon became adept at using a tablet and monitor to draw and paint images.  Because of Gordon’s ability to lead the curve of the new technology he was offered jobs in exotic locations and so he and Maureen lived in Hong Kong, China, New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles where each of their creativity was guided by their experiences and surroundings.  Maureen’s love of ceramics has also taken her to Lill Street Studios in Chicago, Santa Monica College in Los Angeles and other studios along the way.  Studios are shared work spaces where ideas and techniques are exchanged between the various artists.  It was an opportunity for Maureen to learn and to teach and to truly grow professionally.

Gordon’s trip back to fine art came to real fruition after their move to Mexico once he was able to apply his creative talents towards his own, non-commercial creations.  Gordon uses Photoshop to plan out the paintings and develop the characters and subject of his work. If a new idea develops he can then scan the painting into the computer and try out the idea before committing it to the canvas which he does by hand.  Maureen also began exploring her medium to the maximum in Mexico creating geometric and organic ceramic forms (cacti, insects, hearts & functional art) influenced by her environment while incorporating the traditional firing methods in gas and electric kilns as well as pit firing, raku and naked raku techniques.

Gordon’s work is highly detailed and usually bizarre in subject. He uses sculptural elements, usually on highly complicated frames, which help to develop further the ideas in the main image.  There is usually some kind of story being told by an interesting nearly literary character.  A highly colloquial adjective that can describe the work is simply “cool”.  A sense of playful fun exudes from the work.  It is interesting how this same playfulness is also exuded by Maureen’s work.  The ceramic medium because of its more rigorous production demands lends itself to more austere expressions, yet Maureen’s work shares Gordon’s language of the light-hearted and the non-conformist.  It only takes a visit to their home and studio to understand some of the influences that help to form their current common language: vintage toys, robots, and other playful paraphernalia found from their travels around the world – items that contest to their status of children at heart and true admirers of both high and low art.

Come be transported to another world and meet the artists this Saturday, August 4 from 6 to 9 PM at POLYGLOT Gallery.   Exhibition will be on display through August 29.  For a PDF catalog of the show please e-mail info@polyglotgallery.com.